Affordable Ohio Health Insurance Plans

(888) 513-6446

Compare and Save

Archive for the ‘Ohio Health Insurance Quotes’ Category

Preventive Service Changes For Ohio Health Insurance Plans

Posted by

If you purchase an Ohio health insurance plan on after September 22nd (2010), many preventive services will have to be covered  without being subject to a copay or deductible (when these services are completed by a network provider. This change is part of the new health care reform. Of course, rates are expected to modestly increase.

The list of services is listed below. We anticipate that the list of benefits will increase each year, including several additions for women and children. Please contact us if you have any questions or would like any additional information regarding covered medical conditions on single, family, and group plans.

Covered Preventive Services for Adults

  • Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm one-time screening for men of specified ages who have ever smoked
  • Alcohol Misuse screening and counseling
  • Aspirin use for men and women of certain ages
  • Blood Pressure screening for all adults
  • Cholesterol screening for adults of certain ages or at higher risk
  • Colorectal Cancer screening for adults over 50
  • Depression screening for adults
  • Type 2 Diabetes screening for adults with high blood pressure
  • Diet counseling for adults at higher risk for chronic disease
  • HIV screening for all adults at higher risk
  • Immunization vaccines for adults–doses, recommended ages, and recommended populations vary:
    • Hepatitis A
    • Hepatitis B
    • Herpes Zoster
    • Human Papillomavirus
    • Influenza
    • Measles, Mumps, Rubella
    • Meningococcal
    • Pneumococcal
    • Tetanus, Diphtheria, Pertussis
    • Varicella
  • Obesity screening and counseling for all adults
  • Sexually Transmitted Infection (STI) prevention counseling for adults at higher risk
  • Tobacco Use screening for all adults and cessation interventions for tobacco users
  • Syphilis screening for all adults at higher risk

Covered Preventive Services for Women, Including Pregnant Women

  • Anemia screening on a routine basis for pregnant women
  • Bacteria urinary tract or other infection screening for pregnant women
  • BRCA counseling about genetic testing for women at higher risk
  • Breast Cancer Mammography screenings every 1 to 2 years for women over 40
  • Breast Cancer Chemo-prevention counseling for women at higher risk
  • Breast Feeding interventions to support and promote breast feeding
  • Cervical Cancer screening for sexually active women
  • Chlamydia Infection screening for younger women and other women at higher risk
  • Folic Acid supplements for women who may become pregnant
  • Gonorrhea screening for all women at higher risk
  • Hepatitis B screening for pregnant women at their first prenatal visit
  • Osteoporosis screening for women over age 60 depending on risk factors
  • Rh Incompatibility screening for all pregnant women and follow-up testing for women at higher risk
  • Tobacco Use screening and interventions for all women, and expanded counseling for pregnant tobacco users
  • Syphilis screening for all pregnant women or other women at increased risk

Covered Preventive Services for Children

  • Alcohol and Drug Use assessments for adolescents
  • Autism screening for children at 18 and 24 months
  • Behavioral assessments for children of all ages
  • Cervical Dysplasia screening for sexually active females
  • Congenital Hypothyroidism screening for newborns
  • Developmental screening for children under age 3, and surveillance throughout childhood
  • Dyslipidemia screening for children at higher risk of lipid disorders
  • Fluoride Chemoprevention supplements for children without fluoride in their water source
  • Gonorrhea preventive medication for the eyes of all newborns
  • Hearing screening for all newborns
  • Height, Weight and Body Mass Index measurements for children
  • Hematocrit or Hemoglobin screening for children
  • Hemoglobinopathies or sickle cell screening for newborns
  • HIV screening for adolescents at higher risk
  • Immunizationvaccines for children from birth to age 18 —doses, recommended ages, and recommended populations vary:
    • Diphtheria, Tetanus, Pertussis
    • Haemophilus influenzae type b
    • Hepatitis A
    • Hepatitis B
    • Human Papillomavirus
    • Inactivated Poliovirus
    • Influenza
    • Measles, Mumps, Rubella
    • Meningococcal
    • Pneumococcal
    • Rotavirus
    • Varicella
  • Iron supplements for children ages 6 to 12 months at risk for anemia
  • Lead screening for children at risk of exposure
  • Medical History for all children throughout development
  • Obesity screening and counseling
  • Oral Health risk assessment for young children
  • Phenylketonuria (PKU) screening for this genetic disorder in newborns
  • Sexually Transmitted Infection (STI) prevention counseling for adolescents at higher risk
  • Tuberculin testing for children at higher risk of tuberculosis
  • Vision screening for all children

Ohio HSA Account Information Before Obamacare

Posted by

Health Savings Accounts (HSAs) were created by the Medicare bill signed by President Bush on December 8, 2003 and are designed to help individuals save for future qualified medical and retiree health expenses on a tax-free basis. As long as you have a “High-Deductible-Health-Plan” (HDHP), you are eligible to enroll in an HSA. The Affordable Care Act legislation and its Marketplaces that were implemented in 2014, did not remove these types of policies.

Here in Ohio, most major health carriers offer HSAs. Rates can vary, so it is a good idea to shop around for the best rate/coverage in your area. It’s equally important to understand the ramification that Obamacare subsidies have on your current plan. For instance, if your current income level allows you to take advantage of a Silver-tier cost-sharing plan, the substantial reduction in the deductible and maximum out-of-pocket costs may impact the tax-status.

What is a Health Savings Account (“HSA”)?
A Health Savings Account is an alternative to traditional health insurance; it is a savings product that offers a different way for consumers to pay for their health care. HSAs enable you to pay for current health expenses and save for future qualified medical and retiree health expenses on a tax-free basis. You can enroll in a plan through the Marketplace or purchase separately “off-Exchange.”

You must be covered by a High Deductible Health Plan (HDHP) to be able to take advantage of HSAs. An HDHP generally costs less than what traditional healthcare coverage costs, so the money that you save on insurance can therefore be put into the Health Savings Account. Deductibles are high, typically between $4,000 and $6,600 per person.

Health Savings Account Options In Ohio

An HSA Will Save You Money And Reduce Your Taxes

You own and you control the money in your HSA. Decisions on how to spend the money are made by  you without relying on a third party or a health insurer. You will also decide what types of investments to make with the money in the account in order to make it grow. However, with interest rates quite low, typically the “fixed” options pay significantly less than 1%. Equity options are risky and potential returns are not guaranteed.

 

How much does an HSA cost?

 

Prior to the passage of the Obamacare legislation, prices were very low compared to other types of plans. With federal subsidies now offered, although premiums remain fairly low, other subsidized options may provide lower out-of-pocket costs at the same or lower cost.

You can easily compare Ohio HSA rates on our website. Since maximum contributions, cost of coverage, and interest rates change every year, we update the list of eligible policies and their cost each month.

 

What Is a “High Deductible Health Plan” (HDHP)?


You must have an HDHP if you want to open an HSA. Sometimes referred to as a “catastrophic” health insurance plan, an HDHP is an inexpensive health insurance plan that generally doesn’t pay for the first several thousand dollars of health care expenses  (i.e., your “deductible”) but will generally cover you after that .  Of course, your HSA is available to help you pay for the expenses your plan does not cover.

UPDATES:

July 2015 – These types of plans are still available. 2016 rates will be published within the next few months.

Healthcare Companies In Ohio From 2008

Posted by

The five major Ohio health insurance companies are Anthem Blue Cross, UnitedHealthcare, Humana, Medical Mutual and Aetna. Each company offers policies that are distinctly different and quite competitive in most situations. Medical Mutual and Anthem usually offer the lowest Health Savings Account (HSA) rates in the Buckeye State, while Humana offers low cost temporary health care plans. UnitedHealthcare and Aetna offer a wide range of comprehensive and catastrophic policies that give  residents a large choice of options.

Rates are extremely affordable compared to rates from other states. In-state premiums are expected to remain fairly low until 2014 when many of the national health care reform changes begin. Although rates are likely to substantially increase, tax credits could reduce the premiums for those that qualify.

Carriers in our state offer policies to individuals and families. Whether you are unemployed, self-employed, without coverage or on Cobra, there are many policies that will fit within your budget and provide the coverage you need. Most policies are medically underwritten although physicals are rarely required. We”ll be happy to review your options. We never consider any type of “discount plan.”

UPDATES:

June 25 2015 – This was our FIRST blog post from 2008. Admittedly, this article is short, not very informational, and woefully outdated. Many additional carriers now offer plans, including HealthSpan, Ambetter, SummaCare and many others.

By checking more recent posts, you can read and learn about all of the major (and smaller) carriers that feature policies both on and off the Marketplace.